Tuesday, March 6, 2007

Japan: Existence of "Comfort Women" Denied by PM

Comfort women being trucked to a Japanese camp during WWII

JAPAN -- "Comfort women" were forced to work in brothels during World War II; Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says there's no proof that ever happened.

In European countries, it is a punishable offense to deny the Holocaust. In contrast, Japanese war crimes have never been fully prosecuted or acknowledged, nor have most victims been afforded redress. Last week, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe exploited this lack of accountability by asserting that there is "no proof" that women were forced into sexual bondage to serve the Japanese military during World War II, in effect labeling as prostitutes or liars all the thousands of victims of this abhorrent practice. After international outrage erupted, Abe stepped back, but by then the survivors had once more been victimized by his denial of an overwhelming historical record.

The prime minister's revisionist statement contradicts abundant evidence that has come to light despite the government's efforts to conceal or minimize the mistreatment of thousands of women in about 2,000 wartime brothels run by or with the cooperation of the Japanese military. Although no one knows exactly how many girls and women were conscripted to provide sex to Japanese soldiers, most historians estimate the number at between 100,000 and 200,000. Most were Korean and Chinese, though they also included other Asians and Europeans from Japanese-occupied areas. Many were kidnapped and raped, others were tricked or defrauded; some were sold by their families.

Japanese soldiers have come forward during the last 15 years to admit to forcibly taking girls and women on orders of the military. In 1992, documents found in the archives of Japan's Defense Ministry indicated that the military was directly involved in running the brothels. The Japanese government formally apologized to the women in 1993. Since then, Japan's official position has been one of admitting moral but not legal responsibility. A private fund was set up to compensate the former "comfort women," and two Japanese prime ministers wrote formal letters of apology to women who received the payments. Some victims claimed that this ambiguity was unacceptable and refused to accept compensation...

READ THE FULL OPINION PIECE AT LATimes.com

FOR MORE INFO ABOUT COMFORT WOMEN, AND TO VIEW A PHOTO GALLERY, VISIT Comfort-Women.org

No comments:

Post a Comment